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Notices

Free Screening & Immunization Programs

Seasonal Flu Shots

Register for a Seasonal Flu Shot by calling the Linden Board of Health. You need to register annually for this program. Linden Residents, 60 years and older, or those with chronic illnesses are eligible to receive a flu shot.

Health Screening Programs

Diabetic Screening programs, colo-rectal screening and various other screenings are held throughout the year. Please visit this site for important announcements.

Colo-Rectal Cancer Screening

Screening is recommended for those 50 and older. Free colo-rectal screening is available by utilizing the “FIT” test kit. Complete simple instructions and a mailer are included with this kit. Give us a call to obtain a kit.

Well Baby Clinics

The Linden Health Department offers free childhood immunizations for infants from newborn to age 5 years. Contact the Public Health Nurses at (908) 474-8420 for more information and/or to schedule an appointment.

Rabies Immunization Program

There are various times of years that free anti-rabies vaccinations are offered. Please watch the website News column on the home page for announcements. As a reminder for when your dog needs to be vaccinated, view information below.

2019 Annual Seasonal Influenza Immunization Program

The Linden Health Department is currently registering Linden residents for their Annual Seasonal Influenza Immunization program. While no definite clinic dates have been set, you should register to receive a “flu shot” by calling the Linden Board of Health Office at (908) 474-8409. Once registered, you will be notified of the seasonal flu clinic time and date. All  Linden residents age 60 and older and all Linden residents with chronic illnesses are encouraged to be vaccinated against Seasonal Influenza. Linden residents should call the Health Department at (908) 474-8409 between 10am and 4pm to register for a flu shot.

Right of Way Notice

The Linden Shade Tree Commission is responsible for the regulating, planting, care and control of the shade and ornamental trees and shrubbery upon and in the highways and parks of the City. By State Law, the Commission has the “full and exclusive control of the trees in this area and the ground surrounding tree”.

Residents are reminded that the space between the curb/edge of pavement and sidewalk is the City Right of Way. The Right of Way actually extends in at least a few feet inside the sidewalk. In areas with no sidewalks, the Right of Way can extend to 14 feet or more. If you are not sure where the Right of Way begins, the Engineering Department can provide that information. Residents and Tenants are reminded it is unlawful to perform certain acts within the Right of Way and reminded of the following:

  • It unlawful to attach any lights, decorations, signs, wires, birdhouses, etc. to any City Tree or place them within the City Right of Way.
  • Residents may prune sucker growth at the base of trees, being careful not to damage the trunk. If you are not sure of the proper method, contact the Commission and they will instruct you.
  • Do not place excessive mulch around trees. Any mulch should be 1-2 inches maximum in depth and kept at least 6” away from the trunk and root flare of the trees. DO NOT place any planters, edging, bricks, pavers etc. around the tree or within the Right of Way. Avoid dyed mulches. Avoid Bark mulches as they repel water.
  • DO NOT plant any shrubs or trees within the Right of Way.
  • Within the confines of your property, any trees planted at intersecting streets must be of a variety that is below 3 feet in height at mature sized (including any ground elevation height) in the triangle measured horizontally 25 feet from each curb or edge of pavement.
  • It is UNLAWFUL to prune any City Tree whether pruned by the owner or any contractor. The exception of sucker growth is mentioned above.
  • It is UNLAWFUL to place stones, pavers or hardscape within the City Right of Way around trees. Be reminded that a permit is required for any work on sidewalks and/or driveways. There is also a limit to the amount of impervious cover allowed on each lot on the private property side of the Right of Way.

Please view the full document for more information.

Traffic Safety Notice

Road traffic safety refers to methods and measures for reducing the risk of a person using the road network being killed or seriously injured. The users of a road include pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, their passengers, and passengers of on-road public transport, mainly buses and trams. Best-practice road safety strategies focus upon the prevention of serious injury and death crashes in spite of human fallibility (which is contrasted with the old road safety paradigm of simply reducing crashes assuming road user compliance with traffic regulations). Safe road design is now about providing a road environment which ensures vehicle speeds will be within the human tolerances for serious injury and death wherever conflict points exist.

Upcoming Public Meetings

A town hall meeting is an American term given to an informal public meeting, function, or event derived from the traditional town meetings of New England. Typically open to everybody in a town community and held at the local municipal building, attendees generally present ideas, voice their opinions, ask questions of the public figures, elected officials, or political candidates at the town hall. Attendees rarely vote on an issue or propose an alternative to a situation. It is not used outside of this secular context.

Summer Rock Festival Tickets on Sale!

A rock festival, considered synonymous with pop festival, is considered to be a large-scale rock music concert, featuring multiple acts performing an often diverse range of popular music including rock, pop, folk, electronic, and related genres. As originally conceived in the mid to late 1960s, rock festivals were held outdoors, often in open rural areas or open-air sports arenas, fairgrounds and parks, typically lasted two or more days, featured long rosters of musical performers, and attracted very large crowds – sometimes numbering several hundred thousand people.

Local Artist Exhibition

The performing arts community in Louisville, Kentucky is undergoing a renaissance. The Kentucky Center, dedicated in 1983, located in the downtown hotel and entertainment district, is a premiere performing arts center. It features a variety of plays and concerts, and is the performance home of the Louisville Ballet, Louisville Orchestra, Broadway Across America – Louisville, Music Theatre Louisville, Stage One, KentuckyShow! and the Kentucky Opera, which is the twelfth oldest opera in the United States. The center also manages the historic W. L. Lyons Brown Theatre, which opened in 1925 and is patterned after New York’s acclaimed Music Box Theatre.

CDC Warning – Do Not Eat Romaine Lettuce

The CDC is advising that U.S. consumers not eat any romaine lettuce, and retailers and restaurants not serve or sell any, until we learn more about the outbreak. This investigation is ongoing and the advice will be updated as more information is available.

  • Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.
    ◦    This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.
    ◦    If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix contains romaine, do not eat it and throw it away
    ◦    Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where romaine was stored. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.
     
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing romaine.
     
  • Take action if you have symptoms of an E. coli infection:
    ◦    Talk to your healthcare provider.
    ◦    Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
    ◦    Report your illness to the health department.
    ◦    Assist public health investigators by answering questions about your illness.
     
  • Advice to Clinicians
     
  • Antibiotics are not recommended for patients with E. coli O157 infections. Antibiotics are also not recommended for patients in whom E.coli O157 infection is suspected, until diagnostic testing rules out this infection.
     
  • Some studies have shown that administering antibiotics to patients with E. coli O157 infections might increase their risk of developing hemolytic uremic syndrome (a type of kidney failure), and the benefit of antibiotic treatment has not been clearly demonstrated.